nuWho’s 10th Anniversary: Series 1, Part 2 Recalled

Welcome to the second part of our nuWho anniversary podKast, in which we recall the 2005 series of Doctor Who. After all, it’s only 10 years since 2005, not since 2006 and alll the other years since, right? This time, James McLean joins Christian Cawley and Brian A Terranova to discuss the remaining episodes from the 2005 run, Father’s Day through to The Christmas Invasion.

Time to hit play.

[powerpress]

Kasterborous PodKast Series 5 Episode 7 Shownotes

  • Radio Times poll
  • Eclipse
  • Recommendations: Rear Window, Game of Thrones Series 4, Doctor Who Series 1
  • Anthony Dry’s illustration for The Christmas Invasion

PodKast introduction by John Guilor. Theme tune by Russell Hugo

Listen to the PodKast

There are several ways to listen. In addition to the usual player above, we’re pleased to announce that you can also stream the podKast using Stitcher, an award-winning, free mobile app available for Android and iPhone/iPad. This pretty much means that you can listen to us anywhere without downloading – pretty neat, we think you’ll agree! (Note that it can take a few hours after a new podKast is published to “catch up”.)

Stitcher

Audioboom

What’s more, you can now listen and subscribe to the podKast via our Audioboom channel (formerly Audioboo)! Head to https://audioboom.com/channel/doctorwhopodkast and click play to start listening. You can also comment and record your own boos in response to our discussions! Meanwhile you can use the player below to listen through Audioboom:

You haven’t clicked play yet?! What are you waiting for? As well as our new Stitcher and Audioboo presence you can also use one of these amazingly convenient ways to download and enjoy this week’s podKast.

  1. Use the player in the top right of the Kasterborous home page, or visit the podKast menu link.
  2. Listen with the “pop out” player above, which also allows you to download the podKast to your computer.
  3. You can also take advantage of the RSS feed to subscribe to the podKast for your media player, and even find us on iTunes, where your reviews will help the show considerably.

You may also like...

2 Responses

  1. Semi-Evil Semi-Genius says:

    Another great podkast. At the end there, discussing the childhood memories of learning that the different Doctors weren’t in fact different versions of the same man, not the same exact person portrayed by different actors, and that the fact that Davison hanging up the scarf represented the death of Tom Baker’s Doctor got me thinking.
    Each of the Doctor’s incarnations have nuances and gimmicks that are iconic. We all know that. But it seems sacrilege for any new incarnation of the Doctor / new actor in the role to utilize any of the most iconic. Matt Smith wasn’t the first to wear a bowtie, but he made it his thing, and he drops it as he becomes Capaldi’s version, which is very fitting.
    So, my question is: what do you think should be put to rest in future versions of the Doctor to honor the past ones. I think very obviously, we won’t see another Doctor prolifically wear a super-long scarf, or wear a bowtie with every outfit. Maybe no other Doctor should play a clarinet (was it a clarinet with Troughton?); what would the various Doctors’ exclusive traits that no one else should duplicate? Does Capaldi have one, or is it too early to tell? I think he’s definitely going for a gimmick-less Doctor (avoiding catchphrases and the like). I love that for its seriousness and realism (especially since the catchphrase thing is getting kinda meta, and is being overdone for merchandising), but at the same time, I kind of miss it.

    • James McLean says:

      I certainly think the Bowtie is a same nod of finality as the scarf unravelling was for Davison. It carries the same potency, and yes, to some degree, I think each Doctor will carry its own ever-unique moniker. Some stuff will always overlap to some degree, but I think what is emphasised rather than what is necessarily material; if a Doctor discards a catchphrase, wink, a smile, in his final moments, that’s no different to an object. One could argue McGann recalling his companions was a similar effect of finality, closing the door on his era by saying farewell to the people he’d flown with.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *